Watch Reviews

Watches Review: Doxa SUB 300 & SUB 300T

Written by admin

Even though it has a classic Swiss watch brand history and a product lineage filled with a number of watches — including a lot of dress models – Doxa has always been one of those unique “cult favourite” watch brands. Doxa’s “cult status” has made its diver’s-style watches particularly popular, and for good reason. Doxa watches have a lot of fans, and today on aBlogtoWatch, I’m reviewing the Doxa SUB 300, as well as the SUB 300T, which is extremely comparable. In addition to the distinctive “beads of rice” design diver’s bracelet, the Doxa SUB 300/300T will be available in six dial colours by 2020, each with its own product name and available strap.
Let me explain why this watch evaluation actually spans two product lines before getting into some Doxa dive watch history. Doxa currently produces two watches that are inspired by its initial diver’s watches from the late 1960s. The Doxa SUB 300 and SUB 300T are examples of these. Both watches are excellent choices, but Doxa’s oddity is that it provides two timepiece lines that are nearly identical in many aspects. While the SUB 300 and SUB 300 T watches have slight variances in proportions and size, buyers might easily confuse the two at first glance. Thankfully, Doxa marks the watch dials with their names, reducing the chance of misunderstandings. End Of Advertising Message (Advertising Message) (Advertising Message) (Advert
What’s the difference between the SUB 300 and SUB 300 T? In a nutshell, price, size, water resistance, and movement features are all important considerations (for the most part). However, considering how similar both watches appear (nearly identical, in fact), I would argue that there is no clear winner between the two – they are both wonderful timepieces. The SUB 300 is a little more expensive than the SUB 200, though this isn’t usually for obvious reasons. The SUB 300T is a modern homage to the Doxa SUB 300T Conquistador from 1969, and it is the more capable diver’s watch for people who require more serious features.

The Doxa SUB 300 has a width of 42.5mm and a lug-to-lug distance of 45mm. The polished and brushed stainless steel case is 13.4mm thick, and the watch is powered by a COSC Chronometer-certified Swiss Made ETA 2824-2 automatic movement. The case is also 300-meter water-resistant. The matching steel bracelet for the SUB 300 is a little thinner than the SUB 300T, much like the case. The SUB 300 is also $600 more expensive than the SUB 300T in terms of retail price.

The SUB 300T, on the other hand, is slightly bigger, particularly in terms of proportions and thickness. It is half a millimetre thicker and actually a touch shorter (lug-to-lug distance) at 44.5mm broad, so it doesn’t really wear larger. Because of the slightly stubbier lugs, this is the case. Unlike the SUB 300, the SUB 300T sports a sapphire crystal that is flush with the bezel, as opposed to the SUB 300’s box-style crystal. This means that, although being only slightly thicker than the SUB 300, the SUB 300T seems to be noticeably thicker due to the more visible bezel construction. Also, the SUB 300T features an automated helium release valve on the case’s side. Message in Advertising Message At The End Of Advertising

Other minor changes between the two Doxa divers include dial sizes and the style of the no-decompression time restriction scale language. Given its more refined proportions and COSC Chronometer-certified movement, the SUB 300 is a bit dressier (given the thinner size) and slightly more watch-enthusiast-focused model in my opinion. The SUB 300T is the watch to have if you want something a little more substantial.

The Doxa SUB 300T is rated for 1,200 metres of water resistance. (Ironically, the original SUB 300T was water-resistant to 300 metres, but that feature is now reserved for the SUB 300 model, which caters to the small fraction of divers who require it.) The steel case is the same width as the SUB 300 at 42.5mm, although it is a touch “shorter,” as I previously stated. The numerous measurement variances seem to show that, while it makes more sense from a product differentiation standpoint to have these comparable watches be different sizes, Doxa went to great lengths to make the SUB 300T wear as thin as feasible considering its total heft. Other aspects, like as the bracelet, appear to be identical between the two watches, but closer scrutiny reveals that the SUB 300T bracelet is somewhat thicker than the SUB 300 bracelet. The SUB 300T is powered by the same Swiss-made ETA 2824 automatic movement as the SUB 300, however it lacks the COSC Chronometer certification of the SUB 300. (which might also account for part of the difference in cost between these watches).

Both the Doxa SUB 300 and SUB 300T do a good job of retaining the original Doxa diver’s watches from the 1960s as the product’s true inspiration. Because of its historical legitimacy as diver’s watches, this is one of the main reasons why so many watch collectors prefer Doxa. Using an orange-colored dial for a diver’s watch (chosen for its optimal legibility under water) is one of their firsts, as is being the first commercially accessible watch for recreational divers. Prior to that, diver’s timepieces were mostly used by professional divers and the military. Recreational diving did not begin until the 1950s, and brands like Rolex Blancpain and Zodiac were among the first to introduce modern-style diver’s watches (and more).

Given the orange dial’s historical significance. The orange dials on Doxa’s SUB 300 and SUB 300T watches are dubbed “Professional.” Different names are given to different models. The SUB 300 Searambler, for example, is a silver dial model. One of the most fascinating aspects of the Doxa SUB 300T is how it came to be associated with the late diving and action novelist Clive Cussler. Dirk Pitt, the main character in his writings, wears a Doxa SUB 300T Professional watch, which was supposedly mentioned several times in the novels.

Clive Cussler was a scuba diver who worked at a dive shop while pursuing his dream of becoming a writer. Cussler was reportedly given a Doxa SUB 300T by the diving equipment store manager, and he loved it so much that he determined the main character in his book had to wear one as well. While the novels featured the SUB 300T, the storey might just as well have highlighted the SUB 300, given the value they would provide to the main character.

The Doxa SUB 300 and SUB 300T watches excel at their primary function: diver’s watches. The patented unidirectional metal bezels, which include one ring for a 60-minuter counter and another ring for an NDL (no-decompression-limit) scale that is (was) immediately useful for divers ascending back to the surface who don’t want to get decompression sickness, are another iconic feature of the watch.

Diver’s style watches are plentiful in the watch world. What makes Doxa so unique, given its cult-like following? I’m not sure, but I believe Doxa watches have a unique historical tie with the development of modern recreational diving (Doxa worked with legends like Jacques Cousteau when designing it). Doxa watches, on the other hand, have their own distinct, friendly-looking designs. This latter feeling of design distinctiveness, I believe, is what distinguishes Doxa as a desired diver’s watch for a large number of people.

Given the large range of different diver’s watches on the market, I find Doxa’s specific consumer success to be intriguing. There isn’t much that Doxa diver’s watches can’t accomplish that other models on the market can’t, but the Doxa name and fundamental classic style appeal to watch collectors. What is the reason for this? I’ll give you two options.

The first response concerns the appearance of the SUB 300/300T design. It is, in fact, a vintage-inspired design that closely resembles the original. Furthermore, Doxa did not only release a SUB 300 or SUB 300T re-issue, but has been producing these designs for several years, just like Rolex has regularly produced a recognisable Submariner, or Porsche has continuously produced a recognised 911. As a result, the Doxa 300T has become a true cultural symbol.

The polished steel tonneau case is unusual but attractive. It has the appearance of a flying saucer spaceship on your wrist and is really comfortable to wear. The “double” bezel is made up of two rings, which is a Doxa trademark. The case, hands, bezel, and dial are all unique aspects that we haven’t seen replicated by other manufacturers. So you know it’s a Doxa when you see this look.

Whether you like the look of the SUB 300/300T or not, you’ll grow to like them because of their overall comfort and success as tool watches. Doxa never stopped making sure the SUB 300 family was a fine tool watch, thus I believe its design has appeal. Despite the fact that the dial is modest in comparison to the case size, it is extremely legible. Even with gloves on, the unusual-looking bezel is simple to grasp and move. So, with the SUB 300 and SUB 300T, Doxa delivers an excellent bundle as a tool/functional watch.

The dial design is reminiscent of the original dive watch from the 1960s. The minute hand is “oversized” since that’s what divers look at when they’re underwater, and the bezel depicts dual scales of vital information (back when divers didn’t have diving computers). Doxa originally discovered that the best dial colour for underwater legibility was orange. As a result, the SUB 300T Professional is the orange-colored variant, whereas the other dial colours have different designations. The SUB 300 Searambler is the name given to its silver-toned dial. Yellow, black, aquamarine, and navy blue are the other four colours, each with their own unique names. A “box-style” AR-coated sapphire crystal covers the dial of the SUB 300, with an appearance aiming to mimic the first acrylic crystals used on watches starting in the 1960s.

About the author

admin

Leave a Comment