Buying Guides

Top 10 Living Legend Watches To Own

Written by admin

When you look at the collections of many of the most well-known watch companies, you’ll realise that they usually feature a few (or many) classics whose names have been around for years. Rolex, for example, does not release new models, but rather improves on their existing collection over time. Submariner and Datejust models have been around for years. Other manufacturers keep history alive by continuing to provide updated versions of designs that have been popular for years. We’ve compiled a list of the top 10 watches worth possessing in order to recognise and suggest those that are “living classics.” To be clear, a watch must have historic roots and be produced today in order to be considered a living legend. We realise we couldn’t include them all, so let us know which ones are your favourites in the comments section below. Message in Advertising https://8080e8152f1aaae969cb781180e3af16.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html https://8080e8152f1aaae969cb781180e3af16.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html Message At The End Of Advertising

The Rolex Submariner is the first watch that comes to mind.

The Submariner was first introduced by Rolex in 1954, and the watch business has never been the same since. The Submariner was never intended to be a high-end timepiece, but rather a professional diver’s watch that anyone could appreciate. It achieved cult status as a great sports watch, and then in the 1980s, when mechanical watches earned greater luxury status, Rolex began its long journey to become the world’s most desired luxury wristwatch brand. For good reason, the Submariner is their most popular model. Its smooth style is durable and legible, and most significantly, it is acceptable for almost every man (and many women) regardless of appearance, style, or age. It goes without saying that the Rolex Submariner’s timeless design is still going strong in its latest iterations, which have 40mm wide casings in steel, two-tone, or 18k white or yellow gold. With an average price of around $8,500, they’re not cheap, but they’ll last a lifetime and retain their worth. www.rolex.com

2. Speedmaster Omega

The Omega Speedmaster is widely regarded as the archetypal sports chronograph, regardless of price, status, history, or technology. You want a gorgeous, but not flashy, chronograph with a long history, a distinct design, and enough vitality to give a variety of models? That’s a Speedmaster, by the way. What is the reason for this? NASA approved the Omega Speedmaster, and one was worn by Buzz Aldrin on his 1969 moonwalk. The Moonwatch is essentially a chronograph variant of the Submariner; there are numerous models, many of which are available on the used market; they keep their value well and have progressed slowly. You can’t go wrong with a manually wound 3570.50 or the improved co-axial automatic Speedmaster 9300; you’ll own a piece of horological history. Steel variants are priced between $4,500 to $8,700. http://www.omegawatches.com/ https://8080e8152f1aaae969cb781180e3af16.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.htmlAdvertising Message Message At The End Of Advertising

3. Royal Oak by Audemars Piguet

With Audemars Piguet on the verge of bankruptcy in the wake of the quartz revolution, the Royal Oak is the watch that saved them and made them the brand they are today. Audemars Piguet hired Gerald Genta to create a watch that would introduce the brand to a larger market, knowing that revolution was required rather than progress. Genta designed the AP Royal Oak ref 5402ST, which debuted in 1972 with a price so low that it not only out-priced all of its competitors, but it also out-priced most gold watches on the market. The Royal Oak was an all-in play by Audemars Piguet because there was no precedent for a steel luxury sport watch in the world. While the Royal Oak was a divisive concept from the start, it established a new watch archetype, the luxury steel sport watch, and popularity grew quickly enough to keep Audemars Piguet afloat. The distinctive Genta design is now a vital element of Audemars Piguet’s brand image. Beginning at roughly $20,000, audemarspiguet.com is a website dedicated to audemar spiguet.

4. Reverso Jaeger-LeCoultre

The Reverso was introduced in 1931, and it was one of the first partnerships between Jaeger and LeCoultre, who later combined to form a single brand. The Reverso was planned from the start to be a high-end watch designed for members of Britain’s upper crust to wear while playing polo in colonial India. While the notion of a flipping case may appear simple by today’s standards, it proved difficult to industrialise at first. To protect itself, the rectangular case flipped over to reveal a solid metal rear. The angular timepiece’s art deco style and handsome characteristics earned it a fast success among high-society persons, especially in Europe. Reverso production came to a halt in the middle of the twentieth century, and it wasn’t until the 1980s that it began to resurface. This was particularly true in the last two decades. Its handsome style is traditional, yet it’s also timeless and innately manly. In addition, Jaeger-LeCoultre boasts a bewildering assortment of Reverso shapes and sizes to cater to the majority of luxury watch buyers. Jaeger-LeCoultre manufactures the Reverso casing and movement entirely in-house. The average cost is roughly $10,000. http://www.jaeger-lecoultre.com

5. Datejust Rolex

The Datejust, arguably Rolex’s most basic watch, has been present since 1945, when Rolex added a date element to their Bubbleback watch. The Datejust exemplifies what Rolex considers to be the most important features of a timepiece. Rolex is a conservative brand, and the Datejust is their most practical model, delivering only what you need in an everyday watch. Although a 41mm version was introduced in 2009, the Datejust was previously only available in smaller sizes, such as 36mm for men, 31mm for women, and 26mm for ladies. Many prominent people have worn this timeless style, including President Dwight D. Eisenhower, several actors, and even Tony Soprano. The Datejust is a classic Rolex model that works equally well with jeans and a t-shirt as it does with a suit and tie. Prices start at $9,000 for the Datejust II, but if you favour yellow gold and pave diamonds, the sky is the limit. www.rolex.com

Tag Heuer Monaco, No. 6

The Heuer is a Swiss watchmaker. Monaco was introduced in 1969 as one of the earliest automated chronographs and was named after the famed Monaco Grand Prix Formula One track by Jack Heuer. The Monaco was even seen on Steve McQueen’s wrist in the 1971 film Le Mans, with its square casing and now-famous Calibre 11 automatic movement. The Monaco was a chronograph classic that was retired after only a few years, but the design was reissued by McQueen in 1998 and eventually revived by Tag Heuer in 2003. Vintage and limited edition Monacos are highly sought for and command a high price on the used market. A Monaco will give you about as distinct a wrist presence as you can find today, whether you’re emulating Steve McQueen or Walter White. Starting at around $4,500. tagheuer.com is a website that sells watches.

7. Senator Navigator Original Glashutte

Pilot-style timepieces, in addition to diver-style timepieces, are the most popular sport watches, and there are a lot of them. Pilot watches are among the first “big watches,” and it’s difficult to say who invented them originally. From the 1920s onwards, many of the early ones were German and Swiss, according to popular belief. This iconic design has been replicated by hundreds of manufacturers and is frequently referred to as the “B-uhr” name. Because there is no clear “living parent” to the design, we chose the Original Senator Navigator from Glashutte Original to represent this classic living legend watch. Glashutte Original produces a few pieces in their Original Senator Navigator pilot watch collection, which sell for around $7,000 on average and are of exceptional quality, while being hard to come by even where Glashutte Original watches are offered. Other brands who sell this design charge anywhere from a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands of dollars. glashuette-original.com glashuette-original.com glashuette-original.

Breitling Navitimer, No. 8

Another notable pilot watch, the Breitling Navitimer, was introduced in the early 1950s. The combination of a chronograph and a slide-rule bezel made this watch famous. While the Navitimer was not the first Breitling watch to include these features, it was soon accepted by military and professional pilots as a helpful tool since it could perform a variety of in-flight computations in addition to telling time. This was made possible by the combination of a slide rule and a chronograph. The Navitimer’s use faded as cockpits became more digital, but many pilots are still trained to use old analogue calculation techniques as a backup if electronics fail. The Breitling Navitimer is much more than a tool, having earned the distinction of being a high-end tool watch for the discriminating and astute active man. Breitling now provides a Navitimer with their own in-house movements, and it is still one of the brand’s best-selling watches. The cost is approximately $9,000. www.braunschweig.com

Cartier Santos is number nine on the list.

The Cartier Santos is a very long-lasting design that is inextricably related to the birth of piloted flight. Around 1906, Alberto Santos-Dumont became the first person to achieve continuous flight in a fixed-wing aircraft. Dumont was close friends with Louis Cartier, a French jeweller, and had told him about the trouble he had trying to check his pocket watch while flying. Cartier set out to create a wristwatch that would allow Dumont to check the time without having to take his hand off the controls. Cartier designed the first pilot’s watch to assist Dumont with a practical difficulty, and it is thought to have sparked the custom of men wearing timepieces on their wrists, which was previously only done by women. The Santos 100 I is a modern version of the original Santos design.

About the author

admin

Leave a Comment